Good shaft bad shaft?

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cac
cac's picture
Good shaft bad shaft?

After reading a bit about shafts prompted by some interesting threads on here I have a few questions. If a shaft is of a flex y and a weight z. Why is it a good or bad shaft.

If I want flex y and weight z I may see a shaft for £30 or I may see a shaft for £300. Why the difference for the same spec. Cac

DON
Material and labor costs

The Materials vary from shaft to shaft ans so does the way the materials are used. And that is the main reason for the difference is costs. ALL graphite shafts are made up of graphite material. some are thin threads of material that is wrapped around a mandrel to make the shaft, but MOST are made up of graphite CLOTH, that is cut up into pieces and wrapped around the mandrel. The NUMBER of layers and the Quality of the cloth makes for the difference is the cost of the shaft. More layers means more labor means more cost. The better the cloth the more it costs, and the higher the quality of the epoxy resin they use to bond it all together can be a big factor in final cost as well. Add in DESIGN costs to come up with the final design and you have just another factor. R& D costs money so the newest designs tend to cost more than older ones. According to a few videos I've seen online, the factory shafs in most OEM clubs cost in the neighborhood of $3.00 per shaft. Compare that to after market shafts that can cost up to $1000 per shaft, and you have a good idea why off the shelf clubs are NOT all that great compared to custome built clubs with good after market shafts in them and shafts that are properly aligned rather then just glued into the head by some laborer in China making minumum wages in a country known for it's cheap labor. Truth is that good quality graphite shafts for woods can be found for $50 or so, but they can go up into the $400 range if you want the LATEST designs from the top companies. Most golfer can NOT tell the difference between a good $50 shaft and the $400 model. Or at least not enough to justify the much higher cost.. Good graphie shafts for irons cost more like $30-$40 per shaft, and good steel shafts for irons start around $12 and go up to near $40 per club.

Don

Putting is easy if you have the Right Putter.

DON
IF you want to try a very

IF you want to try a very good shaft for your driver at a fair price, I would recommend you try to find a driver with a UST ProForce V2 shaft it it. You should be able to find a club with that shaft at most golf shops that have a decent number of used drivers for sale. It's a good shaft and you should be able to fine one for $60 or less. Might be able to find a used driver with this shaft for LESS than $50 if you look around. I've seen a few for $30 or so with this shaft, so I know it can be done. They come in a few different weights, so you can go with a weight that you like. ME, I like the 77 gram S flex model of the V2 the best for a driver. More weight for a Smoother swing, and the heavier the shaft the Lower the Torque rating it has. I like LOW torque shafts in ALL of my clubs. ALL of the V2 shafts are marked with the grams and Torque value printed on the shaft, along with the flex.

Don

Putting is easy if you have the Right Putter.

Scott Rushing
Scott Rushing's picture
Thanks Don.  You reminded me.

Thanks Don.  You reminded me...I already have a ProForce V2 shaft...in an old old Cobra driver where I had it reshfted once.  So I'm going get that fitted with the OptiFit Callaway tip and give it a try. May also reshaft an R flex shaft I have and try it as well. 

 

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