New Acquisitions

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scomac
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New Acquisitions

I've been playing Ping i25 irons since early in the 2014 season.  I was fitted for the clubs outdoors and the clubs were custom ordered to my specs.  I've been quite pleased with the results I've been getting from these clubs since I bought them.  

When I ordered them I only purchased a part set, 6-PW, as I had a number of hybrids that I thought would work well in conjunction with these irons.  My fitting specs are 1.5° upright lie angle.  I've found that the hybrids I had were too flat to blend in nicely with my irons and that led to acquiring a different hybrid last summer to bridge the gap between the irons and the fairway woods.  That has proven to be a less than ideal solution.

With the above in mind I decided to order the matching 4 and 5 iron from Ping from their back catelogue to fill out my set of irons to matching spec and serial number.  Ping provides this service to existing customers at no additional cost.  Despite the i25 being out of production for over a year, the per unit cost was the same from the back catelogue as I paid when I ordered my original set.  It is actually cheaper than what Ping is charging for the replacement iE1 currently.

The irons arrived today at the course pro shop that I ordered them from to take advantage of a shop credit I had for clubs I had consigned to their annual club swap earlier in the month.  It was rainy, cold and very windy today so I didn't get much of a chance to audition them, but I did take a few cursory swings and hit a few balls.  I've got the confidence that I can hit the long irons based on my experiences with vintage clubs.  Ballflight is quite strong versus what you would expect from a hybrid, but I felt like I was still getting pretty good carry even from the 4 iron.  There is definitely going to be more run-out than with a hybrid, but the tendency to go left is solved with the irons.  Looking forward to getting these out on the course for a more thorough introduction.

Scott Rushing
Scott Rushing's picture
Good luck with those Sco..

Good luck with those Sco...Nice service to have for your customers for sure.  Not sure I've heard of that before. 

I'm sort of like you, but I did order a 4&5I with my Mizuno's last year but I tend to play my existing hybrids.  I want to take some time and go to the range when I'm swinging good and compare them and see the carry distance, the trajectory,etc.  BEcause I know th shafts in the hybrids are mismatched and probably too soft even though they're labelled stiff.  But I tend to hit them pretty well so I wasn't ready to pull them out of the bag just yet .. So testing is in order..

Golf is a game that can only be played...

GolfGearReview.com Administrator

scomac
scomac's picture
Thanks Scott.  Ping customer

Thanks Scott.  Ping customer service really is second to none.  You can still get brand new additional/replacement clubs going all the way back to Eye 2's from 1984!  It took less than 5 minutes to order my additional clubs.  The pro called into the order department, gave the rep. the serial number from my set and he was able to recite my exact fitting specifications to my pro.  They verify that there are no fitting spec. changes; check for inventory and price.  Bingo!  Two weeks from order the clubs were in my hands.

Last year, I got a hold of Ping directly to get assistance in dating a putter I had acquired second hand.  It was an original Zing (which apparently can still be purchased from the back catelogue) that we were able to date as being made from 1971-73 based on the stampings in the head cavity.  They couldn't narrow it down any finer than that as they weren't using serial numbers on putters that far back, but still to have that information on file to this day is pretty amazing.  The only other company in my experience that comes to mind with that sort of service and commitment to maintaining older merchandise is John Deere.

DON
That;s Amaxing service from Ping

That's really rather hard to believe in todays world. Ping sure has GREAT service department to be able to go back into their records and find your spec and then built you two more clubs to mathc what you have. Hard to believe they have the heads in stock as well. You will have to let us know how they work out for you after you have some time to play with them at the range and on the course. Best of luck with your new toys.

Don

Putting is easy if you have the Right Putter.

scomac
scomac's picture
That's really rather hard to

That's really rather hard to believe in today's world. Ping sure has GREAT service department to be able to go back into their records and find your spec and then built you two more clubs to match what you have. Hard to believe they have the heads in stock as well. You will have to let us know how they work out for you after you have some time to play with them at the range and on the course.

Not at all Don.  Ping is a different company than Taylormade for example who are simply interested in flogging as many clubs as possible.  Pings cost more to buy, but you don't have a company working against you by rapid and deep discounting of prices.  The price is the price and that's pretty much it unless they are being replaced by a new model and even then the discounting is modest.  They never blow out their remaining inventory to the on-line retailers like some of their competitors do.  This allows Ping to maintain some inventory for their customer base and ensures that their clubs hold their value in resale situations.

Provide a great quality product with cutting edge technology and great customer service and you have a winning formula!  You also have pricing power because you aren't competeing on price.  It's economics 101 when dealing with discretionary items.  It's exactly the same business model that Titleist uses.  It's no surprise that Titleist and Ping are the largest supporters of the competitive amateur ranks like the NCAA.  They can afford to do it and they are building coustomer loyalty.

AS far as my new irons are concerned, they play exactly like the rest of the set.  Gapping is identical, trajectories are the same.  There are no second rate components being used to get rid of surplus investory.  I'm actually surprised at how easy these mid/long irons are to hit.  I don't know why a person would bother with a hybrid beyond replacing a 2 iron or 3 iron where slow swingers such as myself lack the swing speed to get them airborn.  There is no advantage in accuracy or consistency with a hybrid once you have acceptable launch conditions.  It doesn't hurt that irons are half the price of a hybrid either.  Coming full circle the choice is pretty obvious for me at least.  With the 4 iron yesterday, I was hitting out to the 170 yard marker and beyond with consistency.  I wouldn't hit a hybrid any further.  If I did then it's not really a direct replacement for an iron regardless of the number on the sole.

scomac
scomac's picture
My struggles to get off the

My struggles to get off the tee in decent shape has led to a lot of experimenting this season.  I've tried my everyday driver, my old driver; even dropping the driver altogether and droping my 3W in the bag as the primary tee club.  Nothing has resulted in more than odd passing shot that goes the way I have envisioned.

About a month ago, my youngest son dropped off some clubs that he was no longer using wanting to store them at our house.  I wondered out loud why he didn't just sell them on CL, but here they sit.  

One of the clubs was a Nike SQ Dymo2 driver; one of those sqare headed jobs with a super long shaft.  I tried to hit it in the past but it never worked for me.  I decided to go play around with it last weekend a bit and decided that the shaft was a good 2" too long for the upright nature of the lie angle.  I gripped it right down at the bottom of the grip in what felt like a comfortable address position and started to have a bit of success with it.

Long story short, I ended up cutting it down 2", regripped it with my favourite mid size grip and then began to add lead tape to the sole to get the some weight to the head for improved feel in the swing.  I've used it my last two games and while I'm still learning how to set-up with it to get the best and most consistent results, it has been giving me pretty good performance.  The length is good and the ball is controllable even though I'm still generating a pretty big draw hook off the tee.

Based on my improving play of late, the big square Nike has earned it's spot in the bag.

DON
Funny how teh drive can be

Funny how teh drive can be such a problems. Every driver made in the last 10 years or so has been sold as being Super Forgiving. but most golfers still struggle to hit them well. So much for all those claims that get golfers to buy new clubs.

Don

Putting is easy if you have the Right Putter.

scomac
scomac's picture
It does make you wonder,

It does make you wonder, doesn't it, Don?  I have an old TM R7 425 that I bought new over 10 years ago.  It was the exact club I was hitting in the bay and that's the one I went home with.  I can still hit that club further than anything made when I'm on, but as we all know the driver is the one club that is most sensitive to how we are swinging.  The TM always finds its way into my bag at some point during the year usually after an exteneded period of poor results with newer kit.

I hear other stories of golfers who have had similar experiences with clubs from the early to mid 2000's where there was that one particularly driver that was just golden.  I'm quite convinced that the quality of what was produced then is superior to what we are being sold today.  I still don't have a paint chip off the crown of that TM driver!  Conversely some of the recent stuff can look like it was used to hit gravel within two years.  All the more reason to upgrade I suppose or at least that's the intent.

DON
I've got a few of the old R7

I've got a few of the old R7 drivers on hand as well. I've got a few 425cc and a few 460cc models as well as 1 R7CGB 460cc driver that I rather like. Main reason I like the R7 drivers is that I can change the head weights to get just about any swing weight I need. With a shorter shaft, I can go with heavier screw weights and bring up the swing weight to what I like. Much better than having to add Lead Tape to the sole of the head in my opinion, and it sure looks a lot nicer as well.

Don

Putting is easy if you have the Right Putter.

scomac
scomac's picture
Amongst my inventory of

Amongst my inventory of drivers I have a Callaway Diablo Octane.  It tends to move in and out of the bag depending upon how I'm swinging.  Of late I had been fighting the hooks so the Octane made it's way back in during a driver shoot out.  

I used it last weekend at a scramble and had the best drive I've had with that club this year on the final hole of the day with a beautiful draw of about 260 yards.  When I played on Tuesday I had no such magic with a couple of low knuckling draws of barely 200 yards that felt and sounded a bit odd.

When I pulled the club to hit on the next driving hole I noticed what looked like a crack in the sole of the club from the face about an inch or so back.  I showed it to my playing partners and they agreed that the club appeared to be cracked.  I put it away and proceeded to use my 3W off the tee for the rest of the round.

A couple of days later, I took the club to Golftown for an assessment.  They sloughed it off as being out of warranty, but agreed to call Callaway anyway.  I was told to deal with Callaway directly.  I called them up about and hour later to explain the situation.  I think I got the same CSR that Golftown was speaking to as she was aware of the previous call.  She offered me an out of warranty trade in allowance on a new XR16 at $200 provided I shipped my driver to them.  I asked if I could have the time to demo one first to see if a new club was even worth my while.  That would be fine.

I called the local green grass pro shop where I bought my irons to ask if they still had any Callaway demo clubs that I could try.  The head pro indicated that they had already cleared out their demo drivers the week prior, but he was willing to give me a fitting and handle the transaction with Callaway on my behalf at no charge beyond the trade in difference.  laugh

Time is tight right now as we are going on vacation shortly, but I will be having the fitting when we return and will in all likelihood be getting a new X16 driver specifications to be determined.  I'm almost expecting that I will be going with the HT model and then dialing the loft back in order to keep the face square rather than closed when adding loft to a lower lofted model.  Shaft and flex remains to be determined, but my understanding is that there are several no upcharge options.  Will let you know what I end up with.

Scott Rushing
Scott Rushing's picture
Nice Sco.   I know whenI got

Nice Sco.   I know whenI got fitted for the Mizuno irons I bought last year, pretty much anything but the uber-high end shafts were free upgrades.  Rifle upgrades where free, and several others too.  So yeah I think that's how companies are going now. 

I've not hit the X16 but I'm sure it'll be a good performing driver.  And $200 is a very reasonable price.  Nice trade in allowance.  better than you'd get anywhere else. 

Golf is a game that can only be played...

GolfGearReview.com Administrator

scomac
scomac's picture
I was actually surprised at

I was actually surprised at the offer, Scott.  I guess it's a competitive market out there and the OEM's are willing to fight for market share.  Nothing helps with reputation more than how you treat cusotmers when they have an issue.  That's twice now that i have been looked after by different OEM's on an equipment failure that was out of warranty.  It's refreshing to get this type of service in this day and age when the standard operating model seems to be to hit a price point and then upcharge for everything in order to get prices as low as possible.