Strange DQ's throughout golf history

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Scott Rushing
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Strange DQ's throughout golf history

"Doug Sanders was on fire through the first two rounds of the 1966 Pensacola Open. He shot 63 in the first round and a 67 in the second, opening up a 4 shot lead. Unfortunately, his hot play garnered a lot of attention, and a throng of fans sought his autograph after the second round. Sanders couldn’t pass up this celebrity, so he spent quite some time signing dozens of autographs. Unfortunately, he forgot to sign his name where is mattered most: on his scorecard. He was thus disqualified from the tournament, losing out on the $10,000 prize and another $25,000 in bonuses from the companies endorsing him."

Ouch. That's was an expensive lesson.

Scott Rushing
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Jeff Slumn - 1996 Bay Hill Invitational

Jeff Sluman was only two shots back of the leaders at the 1996 Bay Hill Invitational after two rounds. But in going through the first two rounds in his head while lying in bed, he realized that he may have taken an illegal drop after hitting into a water hazard in the second round. The next day he returned to the scene and determined that he did indeed take an illegal drop—he inadvertently dropped the ball closer to the hole. So he reported himself and was disqualified.

If Thierry Henry had been more like Jeff Sluman back in 2009, Ireland would have been in the 2010 World Cup instead of France.

Golf is a game that can only be played...

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Scott Rushing
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Paul Azinger (1991 Doral Ryder)

Paul Azinger was ejected from the 1991 Doral Ryder Open when his foot accidentally nudged a pebble.

Seriously.

His ball was sitting on the edge of a water hazard, but since it was only partly submerged, he decided he’d wad in and try to give it a whack. While taking his stance, his foot nudged a small rock out of the way. It was pretty harmless, really, but once again someone watching at home noticed the violation and called the PGA to complain. Since Azinger had already signed his card from the round by the time the incident came to light (and thus didn’t have a chance to apply the proper 1-stroke penalty), he was disqualified.

Golf is a game that can only be played...

GolfGearReview.com Administrator

Scott Rushing
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Damed if you do, Damed if you don't

This disqualification proves that, sometimes, you’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t.

You see, after a weather delay at the 1995 Burnet Senior Classic, Bob Murphy was horsing around a bit on a fairway while waiting for play to officially resume. This horseplay entailed taking a few silly practice putts.

Murphy’s playing partner, Mike Joyce, asked a tournament official if such actions were against the rules and found out that, yes, they were. Golfers are not allowed to practice on the competition course on the day of the competition. But Joyce didn’t report Murphy, because he knew he wasn’t really “practicing.” After all, he was on the fairway, not the green. How could taking putts on a fairway help your game?

However, two days later, Joyce told Murphy about the rule, just so he would be aware of it in the future. Mortified, Murphy insisted on turning himself in—a very honorable move. Unfortunately, it is also against the rules not to snitch on someone breaking the rules. So tournament officials also went back and disqualified Joyce.

Brutal. But at least they weren’t ratted out by some dude watching at home on TV.

Golf is a game that can only be played...

GolfGearReview.com Administrator